Tobacco Bag

Rosebud Sioux, South Dakota

American

Tobacco Bag, ca. 1885

  • On View

Deerskin, glass beads, porcupine quills, tin cones and dyed feathers

Dimensions: 42 3/4 × 7 in. (108.6 × 17.8 cm)

Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Pohrt, 1985.93

Many traditional Native American items of clothing were made without pockets. As a result, various bags and pouches were created for carrying all manner of things. The tobacco bag—also referred to as a pipe bag—was the most common accessory for men. As its name implies, it was used as a container for tobacco, pipe bowls, and pipe stems.

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