Owl

Inuit

American

Owl, n.d.

  • On View

Soapstone

Dimensions: 13 × 11 in. (33 × 27.9 cm)

Bequest of Russell J. Cameron, 1997.39

What form a material can take depends on the material’s strengths and limitations, and the skill of the artist. Stone must be carved into a desired shape and is often too heavy to allow for appendages from the main body of the form.Often times Inuit art take an almost abstract form. In this sculpture the artist suggests the form of an owl in his carving. The Snowy Owl, one of the largest birds in the Arctic, is likely the type of owl depicted here. There are no added details or line carvings, as there often is in Inuit carving. The shape of the uncarved stone helped to dictate its shape and allowed for minimal carving to be done in order to convey the idea of an owl.

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