Graphisme Concrèt

This object is only available as a thumbnail. Why?

Joan Miró

Spanish, 1893 - 1983

Graphisme Concrèt, 1952

  • Not On View

Pastel, ink and charcoal on paper

Dimensions: 27 9/16 × 39 1/2 in. (70 × 100.3 cm)

Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Keith Davis, 1969.59

Joan Miró helped pave the way for a new visual art movement after World War II called Surrealism, which closely followed the theories of early psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud. Seeking to create a new reality, Surrealist artists drew heavily on the subconscious—dreams, chance effects, the irrational, and fantasy. In an effort to make contact with the subconscious, they experimented with automatism, an approach in which the artist moves the pencil or brush without conscious direction.Miró's characteristic biomorphic shapes float through Graphisme Concret, complete with fantastic creatures inhabiting the space. Though the shapes were created in a spontaneous manner, they are not entirely abstract. Miró's composition remains somewhat figurative; the creature-like forms look as though they stand upon a "ground."

Image Permissions

Explore Related Objects


Une Telle et son petit mari, 1970
Joan Miró

Etching, aquatint, and carborundum on paper
2001.16


Serie Gaudi, 1979
Joan Miró

Etching and aquatint on paper
2001.17


L'Equarressier à l'ouvrage (The Wood-Squarer at Work), 1968
Joan Miró

Color lithograph on paper
1998.15


Femme en colère (Angry Woman), 1958
Joan Miró

Etching and aquatint on paper
2007.88


Femme en colère (Angry Woman)
Joan Miró

Etching on paper
2010.189


Composition, n.d.
Joan Miró

Lithograph on paper
2010.190


Derrière le miroir (Behind the Mirror), 1963
Joan Miró

Lithograph on paper
2010.202


Derrière le miroir (Behind the Mirror), 1956
Joan Miró

Lithograph on paper
2010.203