The Comic Almanack, July- Vauxhall Gardens

George Cruikshank

English, 1792 - 1878

The Comic Almanack, July- Vauxhall Gardens, 1835

  • Not On View

Etching on paper

Dimensions: 4 9/16 × 7 1/4 in. (11.6 × 18.4 cm)
Image: 3 5/16 × 5 in. (8.4 × 12.7 cm)

Gift of Grayce Scholt, 2010.33

Vauxhall Gardens, which was a pleasure park of great entertainment for Londoners, closed only five years following the production of this scene; nonetheless, for up to 200 years it was a site of great importance to the city. Vauxhall was a venue designed to please the masses, allowing for refreshments, outdoor walkways, romantically lit rendezvous points, and musical performances. Able to accommodate many thousands of people at a time, it was a site for seeing and being seen, as evidenced by the man with the monocle watching another couple rush by. Cruikshank captures a quintessential London experience that celebrates the anxiousness of city folks to receive approval from their peers in their summer fashions. Several pairs of men and women likely point to the "lovers' lane" quality of the park. A waiter scurries across the foreground to bring wine to his customers, while the cramped pictorial space highlights the confusing nature of the crowded urban experience.

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