Funerary Figure

Fante peoples

Republic of Ghana

Funerary Figure, n.d.

  • Not On View

Terra cotta

Dimensions: 9 1/2 in. (24.1 cm)

Gift of Justice and Mrs. G. Mennen Williams, 1973.53

Terracotta funerary sculpture was a prominent way Ghanaian artists commemorated the deceased. This tradition dates back to the 16th century. Most of these sculptures were created by women and are thought to be portraits of the dead. The basic representations usually entailed a few individualizing details. Most all of these forms involved the flattening of the head, which was a cultural practice among the living and was thought to be a symbol of beauty.

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