Gift of Cynthia Griffin, 2016.3

All Things Being Equal

October 1, 2016 - October 31, 2016

Sam Jury, English, 2009, 11:58 min.

Throughout her career, British artist Sam Jury has focused her attention on the psychological impact of film and how ubiquity shapes our understanding of self and society. All Things Being Equal is a looped video that explores the notion of suspended trauma; the idea that dramatic and traumatic incidents from the past are continually repeated and replayed, no longer just as personal memories but also vicariously through the ever-expanding shared experience of mass media depiction. In both, the document is detached from its original time and place. It perpetually hangs in the conscience, seemingly without conclusion. All Things Being Equal depicts the repetitive movements of a figure in confinement, beleaguered by water: an element that is both destructive and sustaining. Here the water moves almost as an independent agency, and the figure is neither suffocating nor surviving.

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Edgar Hilaire Germain Degas
French, 1834–1917
Danseuse á la barre (Dancer at the Bar), ca. 1885 
Charcoal and pastel on paper
19 3/8 x 22 inches (sheet) 
9 x 12 1/4 inches (image) 
Gift of The Whiting Foundation in memory of Alice D. Johnson, 1988.1


Drawn to the Figure

September 24, 2016 - November 27, 2016

Graphics Gallery

Drawn to the Figure features drawings that explore how human bodies hold powerful potential for artistic expression. Utilizing live models, photographs, memory, or the imagination each artist in this exhibition represents the human form in their own unique manner. Some seek to perfectly replicate the proportions, musculature, and fine details, while others treat the depiction of the human form more abstractly. 

During the Renaissance, drawing became the foundation for the academic principles of art. Before artists learned to paint, they learned to draw. Since then, countless subjects have been rendered in graphite, chalk, and pastel but none has been more prominent than the human body. Because drawing the figure was a requisite skill, artists carefully studied the structure of the human body, at first from cast-plaster statuary and eventually live models. A figure drawing may be created in preparation for a more finished work such as a painting or it may be the final artwork in and of itself. A naturalistic approach to drawing the human figure prevailed until the late 19th century when many artists, liberated from past traditions, began to experiment with abstraction by choosing to exaggerate or distort proportions emphasizing the pose or mood of the models.

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Giovanni Battista Piranesi 
Italian, 1720–1778 
Title Plate from The Carceri, 1761 
Etching on paper 
22 1/4 x 16 3/16 inches 
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Keith Davis

Pressed for Time: History of Printmaking

September 17, 2016 - December 30, 2016

Hodge Gallery Henry Gallery

Don’t miss your opportunity to see Pressed for Time: The History of Printmaking. This exhibition is a survey of relief, intaglio, planographic, and stencil—the four major processes of printmaking in the Western world from the 15th century to the 21st. These prints highlight what artists have made possible within the remarkable diversity and ingenuity of this medium. Included in the exhibition are works by artists such as Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt van Rijn, James Abbot McNeill Whistler, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Mary Cassatt, Romare Bearden, Andy Warhol, Bridget Riley, and Shepard Fairey.

This exhibition is drawn primarily from the collection of the Flint Institute of Arts with additional loans from the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts and private collectors. The FIA has been collecting prints since 1930 and continues to actively pursue both historical and contemporary works of art. Of the 8,000 objects in the permanent collection, more than 3,000 are prints. 

If you are interested in starting your own print collection, you will not want to miss the 2016 Flint Print Fair. 

The exhibition has been organized by the Flint Institute of Arts and the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts.

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Qing Dynasty, 1644–1911/12

China

Brush Washer: Zhi-Long Dragon, 18th century

Porcelain with celadon glaze

2 1/2 x 4 1/4 diameter 

Gift of F. Karel Wiest, 1982.328

Clay Through Time: Ancient to Contemporary Ceramics

April 23, 2016 - October 30, 2016

Ann K. Walch-Chan Gallery

Ceramic art is one of the oldest human activities, shedding light on the cultures where it was made and revealing technological and artistic achievements. Whether molded into a simple bowl or transformed into an ornate figure, clay is one of the basic artistic materials used in nearly all regions of the world. After the discovery that fire could transform soft, malleable clay into hard, durable objects, the art of ceramics was born.

Ceramics are one of the most technically challenging forms of art. The modeling methods are vast, the glazes are complex, and the firing processes are precise. Unlike a painting where forms develop with each brushstroke, the outcome of ceramic art is not immediate. It is only at the end, after the firing is compete, when the final result is revealed.

The FIA has a diverse collection of nearly 900 ceramic objects that include everything from Chinese Neolithic vessels to works by contemporary artists.Clay Through Time will feature about 50 objects and explores the many styles and functions of ceramic art, as well as various forming, glazing, and firing techniques.

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Image copyright of the artist, courtesy of Video Data Bank, www.vdb.org

Bataille

April 1, 2015 - April 30, 2015

Belgian, 2003, by Nicolas Provost, 7 min.

In Bataille, fragments from the Akira Kurosawa's 1951 film Rashomon are subject to a mirror effect. The term rashomon refers to situations in which multiple eye-witnesses give conflicting testimonies. Bataillerecounts the story of a woman being raped and a man being murdered from various rashomon perspectives. The mirror effect turns each character on themself, reiterating that the rashomon can be self-serving and people see only what they want to see.

Special thanks to  

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