Thomas Nast
American, b. Germany 1840 - 1902 
"Continue That I Broached In Jest" - Shakespeare, from Harper's Weekly
engraving in newsprint, 1876
16 9/16 x 11 1/4
From the Michael Kelly Collection

Worth a Thousand Words: American Political Cartoons

November 3, 2012 - January 6, 2013

Graphics Gallery

From the Michael Kelly Collection

Worth a Thousand Words explores the history of American political cartoons in the 19th and early 20th century from the collection of Michael Kelly. In the pages of popular magazines, such as Harper's Weeklyand Puck, cartoonists sought to influence public opinion through the use of widely and instantly understood imagery. Several works in the exhibition were created by Thomas Nast (1840–1902), who defined American political cartooning in the 19th century. Through Nast's work for Harper's Weekly, he popularized such American political symbols as the Republican elephant and the Democratic donkey. 

From the Exhibition

  • Louis M. Glackens, American 1866-1933, The Full Dinner Pail, from Puck, 1912, engraving on newsprint, 16 7/8 x 12 1/2. From the Michael Kelly Collection

  • Thomas Nast, American, b. Germany 1840–1902, Stranger Things Have Happened, from Harper's Weekly, 1879, engraving on newsprint, 15 15/16 x 10 1/2. From the Michael Kelly Collection

  • Thomas Nast, American, b. Germany 1840–1902, Is This a Republican Form of Government? Is This Protecting Life, Liberty, or Property? Is This Equal Protection of the Laws?, from Harper's Weekly, 1876, engraving on newsprint, 15 5/8 x 11 1/8.
    From the Michael Kelly Collection

  • Thomas Nast, American, b. Germany 1840–1902, Out of the Ruins, from Harper's Weekly, 1873, engraving on newsprint, 15 15/16 x 11 3/16. From the Michael Kelly Collection