Jason Mitcham

Head Full of Doubt/Road Full of Promise, 2010

American, b. 1979

4:20 minutes 

Courtesy of the artist

Head Full of Doubt/Road Full of Promise

November 1, 2017 - November 30, 2017

Fleckenstein Video Gallery

Head Full of Doubt/Road Full of Promise, described as a moving painting, explores notions of temporality, evolution, and modernity. Artist Jason Mitcham made 2,600 alterations to a single canvas to produce this stop-motion video. Creating in this way becomes less about the final painting and more about the evolution of the narrative. According to Mitcham, the purpose of each brushstroke “is to bridge the one before it and the one that will follow it. More than likely it will be overlayed later on, by other marks needed to tell another part of the story. The painting must be allowed to destroy itself in order to become itself. This correlates to the concepts within the work, and the video excavates the painting, allowing its history and narrative to be revealed.”

Exhibition Info


Nina McNeely

MORPH, 2014

American, b. 1983

3:39 minutes

Courtesy of the artist

MORPH

December 1, 2017 - December 31, 2017

Fleckenstein Video Gallery

MORPH is a playful and visually spellbinding performance by choreographer and animator Nina McNeely. Through the use of projection mapping and synchronized movements, she is transformed into a colorful array of creatures and characters. Inspired by the concept of shape-shifting in both folklore and contemporary culture, MORPH journeys through surrealist pop, a mythical animal kingdom, and into a divine realm of apparitions and deities. This piece narrows the line between dreams and reality while inviting the viewer to be transported back into a childlike state of innocence where color is omnipresent, time is nonlinear and illusion is endless. 

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Takahashi Hiroaki

Japanese, 1871­–1945

Untitled (Landscape with Mountain), ca. 1900–1920

Woodblock on paper

15 x 17 inches

Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Burlingame, FIA 1978.12

Rhythms and Experiences: Everyday Life in 19th-century Japanese Prints

January 13, 2018 - April 15, 2018

Graphics Gallery

This exhibition curated by Sarah Lippert will explore Japanese prints from the FIA's permanent collection. Dr. Sarah Lippert associate professor of art history at the University of Michigan-Flint will be guest curating the exhibition.

The Graphics Gallery is sponsored by


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Ntombephi “Induna” Ntobela

My Sea, My Sister, My Tears, 2011

Glass beads sewn onto fabric

24 x 24 ⅜ inches

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence

January 21, 2018 - March 31, 2018

Hodge Galleries

Ubuhle Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence showcases a new form of textile art known as ndwango, developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Ubuhle [Uh-Buk-lay] means “beauty” in the Xhosa [Ho-Sa] and Zulu languages, and it also describes the shimmering quality of light on glass that for the Xhosa people has a particular spiritual significance. By stretching textile (ndwango) like a canvas, the artists transform the flat cloth into a contemporary art form colored with Czech glass beads. The artwork not only provides an emotional outlet for a community affected by HIV/AIDS and low employment, but allows a route for financial independence for these artists. 

Ubhule Women: Beadwork and the Art of Independence was developed by the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum, Washington, DC in cooperation with Curators Bev Gibson, Ubuhle Beads and James Green, and is organized for tour by International Arts and Artists 


Exhibition Info


From the Exhibition

  • Tshengi Duma, Sthembile Majola, Nontanga Manguthsane, Nonhlakanipho Mndiyatha, Kalipha Ntobela, Ntombephi Ntobela, and Thembani Ntobela, The African Crucifixion, 2008. Glass beads sewn onto fabric. 177 ½ x 275 ¾ x 16 inches

  • Zondlile Zondo, Flowers for the Gods, 2012. Glass beads sewn onto fabric. 49 ⅝ x 20 ⅛ inches.

  • Bongiswa Ntobela, Funky Bull, 2006. Glass beads sewn onto fabric. 51 ¼ x 59 ⅛ inches.

Clichy
French
Concentric millefiori, pink and white Clichy rose canes, in pink and white stave basket, 19th century
Glass
1 11/16 x 2 7/16 inches 
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. William L. Richards, FIA 1969.75.48

Small Worlds

April 7, 2018 - October 7, 2018

Ann K. Walch-Chan Gallery

This exhibition presents a survey of glass paperweights from the 19th century to present day. It highlights different techniques, styles, and various types of paperweights.

Exhibition Info


From the Exhibition

  • Baccarat, French, Garland on white "stardust" carpet ground, mid-19th century. Glass, 2 3/16 x 3 3/16 inches. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. William L. Richards, 1969.75.51

  • Paul Stankard, American, b. 1943, Rose Bouquet with James Joyce in a Potato Orb, 2007. Glass, 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches. Private collection 

Davis Cone

American, born 1950

State-Autumn Evening, 2002

Acrylic on canvas

26 1/2 × 46 1/2 inches (67.3 × 118.1 cm)

Collection of John Gordon EXL_FLEH_11

From Lens to Eye to Hand: Photorealism 1969 to Today

April 21, 2018 - August 12, 2018

Hodge Galleries

From Lens to Eye to Hand reexamines this important movement in contemporary art that found its roots in the late 1960s in California and New York and continues today. Use of the camera as the foundation of painterly expression is common today, but these artists were embarking on a new way of seeing and depicting the world and were groundbreaking in their creative process. The works in the exhibition demonstrate that Photorealism remains undiluted, conceptually coherent, and consistently compelling. Viewers can approach the work in an immediate level, for its technique, finesse, and appealing subject matter; but viewers can also go deeper, and enjoy the complexity and contradictions, the multiple means of entrance that Photorealism affords. 

The exhibition was organized by the Parrish Art Museum, Water MIll, New York.

Exhibition Info


From the Exhibition

  • Robert Bechtle, American, born 1932. '73 Malibu, 1974. Oil on canvas. 48 × 69 inches (121.9 × 175.3 cm). Meisel Family Collections, New York EXL_FLEH_2.

  • Audrey Flack, American, born 1931. Wheel of Fortune, 1977–1978. Acrylic and oil on canvas. 96 × 96 inches (243.8 × 243.8 cm). Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York. Gift of Louis K. and Susan P. Meisel, 2016.20 EXL_FLEH_16.

  • Ralph Goings, American, born 1928. Miss Albany Diner, 1993. Oil on canvas. 48 × 72 inches (121.9 × 182.9 cm). Heiskell Family Collection EXL_FLEH_19.

  • Richard McLean, American, born 1934. Western Tableau with Rhodesian Ridgeback (Trails West), 1993. Oil on linen. 48 × 70 inches (121.9 × 177.8 cm). Meisel Family Collections, New York EXL_FLEH_23.

  • John Salt, English, born 1937. Albuquerque Wreck Yard (Sandia Auto Electric), 1972. Oil on canvas. 48 × 72 inches (121.9 × 182.9 cm). Meisel Family Collections, New York EXL_FLEH_31.

  • Richard Estes, American, born 1932. Hotel Empire, 1987. Oil on canvas. 37 1/2 × 87 inches (95.3 × 221 cm). Meisel Family Collections, New York EXL_FLEH_14.

Gregorio Lazzarini

Italian, 1655–1730

Judith and Holofernes, ca. 1670–1730

Oil on canvas

64 1/2 x 80 inches

Museum purchase with funds from the Jill Ford Murray Irrevocable Trust in memory of her parents, Carlotta Espy Ford and George Ross Ford, Jr., and her grandparents, Grace Miller Ford and George Ross Ford, 2011.318

Art of Collecting

November 24, 2018 - January 6, 2019

Hodge Galleries

The Art of Collecting, organized by the FIA, is an exhibition of paintings, prints, drawings, and sculptures on consignment from galleries in New York, Chicago, and Detroit that have been selected based on comparisons of price and quality.  All the artworks are available for purchase. Each object represents and outstanding value in the art market and an excellent opportunity for seasoned, as well as novice, collectors to purchase high quality artwork with confidence. Prices range from as low as $150 for prints by emerging artists to more than $100,000 for works by master artists.  

Exhibition Info