Auguste Rodin

French, 1840 – 1917

Large Hand of a Pianist, modeled 1885; Musée Rodin, cast 9 in 1969

Bronze

7 1/4 × 10 × 4 7/8 in. (18.4 ×25.4 × 12.4 cm)

Lent by Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation

Rodin: The Human Experience – Selections from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Collections

May 6, 2017 - July 30, 2017

Hodge Galleries

In commemoration of the hundredth anniversary of the death of sculptor Auguste Rodin (French, 1840–1917), the Flint Institute of Arts presents Rodin: The Human Experience/Selections from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Collections. At the peak of his career, Rodin was regarded as the greatest sculptor since Michelangelo. Leaving behind 19th-century academic traditions, Rodin focused on conveying the vitality of the human spirit. His vigorous modeling emphasized his personal response to the subject, and he captured movement and emotion by altering traditional poses and gestures. Rodin’s sculpture is often considered a crucial link between traditional and modern art.  

Rodin: The Human Experience showcases over more than 45 bronze sculptures from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Collections, from small-scale to monumental works. Included are some of the artist’s best-known pieces, such as studies for his monuments to Balzac and The Burghers of Calais, works from The Gates of Hell, and portraits of well-known people, like writer Victor Hugo and artist Claude Lorraine.

Between 1945 and the early 1990s, B. Gerald Cantor (1916–1996) and his wife, Iris, created the world’s largest and most comprehensive private collection of works by Auguste Rodin. Over 500 objects from the Cantor Collection have been donated to the Cantor Foundation, as well as to more than 100 museums worldwide, including the FIA.

This exhibition has been organized and made possible by the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation

Exhibition Info


From the Exhibition

  • Auguste Rodin, French, 1840 – 1917, Narcisse, modeled about 1882,enlarged and retitled 1890; Musée Rodin, cast 8/8 in 1985, Bronze, 32 × 13 × 12 1/4 inches. Lent by Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation.

  • Auguste Rodin, French, 1840 – 1917, Three Faunesses, modeled before 1896; Musée Rodin, cast in 1959, cast number unknown, Bronze, 9 1/4 × 11 1/2 × 6 1/2 inches. Lent by Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation.

  • Auguste Rodin, French, 1840 – 1917, Fallen Caryatid with Urn, modeled 1883, enlarged 1911-17; Musée Rodin, cast 4 in 1982, Bronze, 45 1/4 × 36 3/4 × 31 1/8 inches. Lent by Iris Cantor.

  • Auguste Rodin, French, 1840 – 1917, Bust of Victor Hugo, modeled 1883; cast number and date unknown, Bronze, 17 × 10 1/4 × 10 3/4 inches. Lent by Iris Cantor.

  • Auguste Rodin, French, 1840 – 1917, Hand of God, modeled 1898; cast number and date unknown, Bronze, 12 3/4 × 11 1/4 × 11 3/4 inches. Lent by Iris Cantor.

  • Auguste Rodin, French, 1840 – 1917, Large Clenched Left Hand, modeled 1884; Musée Rodin, cast 3 in 1966. Bronze, 18 1/4 × 10 3/8 × 7 5/8 inches. Lent by Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation

Hans Alexander Mueller

American, b. Germany, 1888–1962

Self-Portrait, ca. 1950

Woodcut on paper

15 7/8 x 11 1/8 inches

Gift of Mr. Jack B. Pierson, FIA 1985.25


Self-Expression: University of Michigan-Flint Student Organized Exhibition

May 13, 2017 - July 30, 2017

Graphics Gallery

When artists create self-portraits, they reveal more than just their likenesses. Self-portraits are often windows into artistic psyches, giving viewers a glimpse at how artists see themselves or wish to be seen. In a self-portrait, an artist materializes the abstract and internal on paper, deliberately choosing how to present themself. Self-portraits merge the artist’s objective physical likeness with a subjective and self-composed portrayal of their identity. Self-Expression is a selection of 20th-century self-portraits on paper drawn from the FIA’s permanent collection, including woodcuts, lithographs, and etchings. The styles of self-presentation vary widely, featuring realistic to surreal portrayals, in serious to playful, and straightforward to complex approaches. Carefully constructed, and as individual as the artists who created them, these self-portraits explore intersections of self and artistic identity.

This exhibition is organized and curated by University of Michigan-Flint students enrolled in Dr. Sarah Lippert’s Museum Studies course. The students developed, researched, and curated the exhibition.

The Graphics Gallery is sponsored by


Exhibition Info


From the Exhibition

  • Daniel Serra-Badue, Cuban, 1914–1996, Self-Portrait at Age 48, 1973. Lithograph on paper, 13 3/4 x 17 5/8 inches. Gift of Jack B. Pierson in memory of Robert Martin Purcell, FIA 1979.195


Video courtesy of the artist and Mark Moore Fine Art

Mound

May 1, 2017 - June 30, 2017

Fleckenstein Video Gallery

2011, Allison Schulnik, American b. 1978, 4:23 minutes

In Mound, Allison Schulnik creates an alternate world where over 100 hand-sculpted and sewn figures morph with fluid movements. Their bodies dance and sway in a melancholic fashion to the haunting 1969 recording of It’s Raining Today by Scott Walker. 

Schulnik uses traditional stop-motion techniques, shooting each image frame by frame, without the use of special effects or digital manipulation. Comprising over 6,000 frames, the film took nearly eight months to create. Schulnik received a BFA in experimental animation from the California Institute of the Arts. In addition to art making, she has a background in dance and music. 

Exhibition Info


From the Exhibition

  • Allison Schulnik, Artist

  • Still from Mound

Chinese, Qing Dynasty, 1644–1911/12
Pair of Cranes, late 19th century 
Jadeite
14 1/4 inches high, each 
Gift of Miss Carol C. Pierson, 2005.193.1-.2

Art of Jade

November 19, 2016 - July 30, 2017

Ann K. Walch-Chan Gallery

Since the Neolithic period, jade has been valued for its rarity as well as its beauty. Varying from pure white to dark black, deep green to vibrant red, the color of jade has endless aesthetic possibilities. The artworks in Art of Jade were made through patiently grinding and drilling for days, months, and even years. Little by little, the objects transformed from solid masses into works of art.

Because of the stone’s beauty, strength, and rarity, jade artworks have become symbols of social identity, hierarchy, status, wealth and power in both Chinese and Mesoamerican cultures. This exhibition features over 70 objects from Mesoamerican cultures, dating back as early as 1800 BCE, and from China dating from 3,200 BCE.

Exhibition Info


From the Exhibition

  • Maya culture, Central America, Mosaic Mask, ca. 600–900. Jade with shell, obsidian, 3 x 3 1/4 x 1 1/4 inches. Gift of Barry Fitzmorris, FIA 2011.219

  • Qing Dynasty, 1644–1911/12, Chinese, Chime: Dragon in Clouds, 1765, Jadeite, 26 7/8 x 29 3/4 x 12 1/4 inches. Gift of Mrs. Fredrick B. Miner, FIA 1968.13

  • Chinese, Qing Dynasty, 1644–1911/12, Palette, 19th century. Jadeite, 3 3/4 x 6 x 15/16 inches. Gift of Miss Carol C. Pierson, 2005.83

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