New Archaeological Evidence for the Biblical Kingdom of David

January 11 • 6:00p

FIA Theater/Virtual

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Dr. Michael Pytlik, Guest Lecturer 

aerial shot of archaeological excavation site

Oakland University, in partnership with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, has conducted field excavations at the ancient site of Khirbet Qeiyafa, or Biblical Sha'arayim. The project was devoted to a regional assessment of the early Judean monarch (circa the early 10th century BCE) over eleven field seasons. This and other sites recently excavated revealed for the first time archaeological data about the kingdom from the time of King David. This site revealed details about ancient Israel from the time of David, including biblical religion, daily life, the ancient diet, socio-political details, and more. This talk will discuss why the site was selected for excavation, the exciting finds, and the scope and reach of the kingdom associated with the historical kingdom of David.

Dr. Michael Pytlik
Dr. Michael Pytlik

Dr. Michael Pytlik is Adjunct Assistant Professor in Anthropology and Religion and the Director of Jewish Studies at Oakland University. He has excavated a number of biblical and more recent sites in Israel and takes students from Oakland to Israel each year on excavations. Dr. Pytlik has a Bachelor’s degree in History and Philosophy, a Master's in Jewish Studies, and a Doctorate in Jewish Studies from Spertus College of Judaic Studies and Leadership, Chicago. His area of study was historical and theological questions relating to the early Israelite monarchy at the time of King David. He teaches courses in the Archaeology of Israel, Archaeology of Sacred Sites, Jewish History, Theology, Religion and Culture, and World Religions. 


Shady Ladies of the Metropolitan Museum

February 9 • 6:00p

FIA Theater 

Andrew Lear, Guest Lecturer 

Thomas Gainsborough, British, Sudbury 1727–1788 London . Mrs. Grace Dalrymple Elliott (1754?–1823), 1778. Oil on canvas, 92 1/4 x 60 1/2 inches. Bequest of William K. Vanderbilt, 1920, 20.155.1. Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Thomas Gainsborough, British, Sudbury 1727–1788
London. Mrs. Grace Dalrymple Elliott (1754?–1823),
1778. Oil on canvas, 92 1/4 x 60 1/2 inches. Bequest
of William K. Vanderbilt, 1920, 20.155.1.
Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Many elegant ladies hang on the walls of museums like the Metropolitan Museum of Art (the Met). And you might imagine that they are all princesses and duchesses. In fact, however, many of them are royal mistresses and courtesans—categories of women who are now almost forgotten but who had considerable importance in many historical societies, from classical Athens to Edo Period Japan, to Belle Epoque Paris. In this lecture, you will learn about their complicated lives, their social roles, and about their importance to the art of several cultures—all through their appearances in the Met’s collections.

Guest Lecturer Andrew Lear
Andrew Lear

Andrew Lear is a world expert on gender and sexuality in the Classical world, particularly in art and poetry. His Images of Ancient Greek Pederasty has been called a classic in the field of iconography.  During his academic career, he taught at Columbia University, Pomona College, and NYU. In retirement, he founded two tour companies, both based at the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Oscar Wilde Tours, focused on LGBT+ history, and Shady Ladies Tours, focused on women’s history. He is also working with author and actor Stephen Fry on a TV series about the “Scandals and Secrets of London’s National Portrait Gallery.”

The Sheppy Dog Fund Lecture logo

The Sheppy Dog Fund Lecture has been established to address the topics of art, religion, and history, and is funded annually by The Sheppy Dog Fund, Dr. Alan Klein, Advisor.

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2020/2021


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The Sheppy Dog Fund Lecture has been established to address the topics of art, religion, and history, and is funded annually by The Sheppy Dog Fund, Dr. Alan Klein, Advisor.For more Sheppy Dog Fund Lecture, click here.